County Celebrates ‘Bike To Wherever Days 2020’

first_imgCOUNTY News:Los Alamos County is celebrating “Bike to Wherever Days 2020” Sept. 23-27. With so many people out bicycling and the need to keep everyone healthy and safe, Bike to Work Day 2020 is now Bike to Wherever Days.While all the typical Bike to Work pit stops will be missed, bicyclists have the opportunity to share photos and stories about how they Bike to Wherever.The community is encouraged to share photos of solo or family rides on social media using #LosAlamosBikeToWherever and share the joy biking brings them to win a raffle prize.  Show the county, show the world, show neighbors the power of bicycling. By sharing their “reason to ride” on social media and encouraging friends and family across the country to go by bike, everyone can experience the joy of biking together even as they keep their distance.last_img read more

The lions weep tonight

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HSBC seeks sale and leaseback for Manhattan headquarters

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EDITORIAL: Masks. No longer just a safe option

first_imgCategories: Editorial, OpinionNow you’ve gone and done it.Health officials have been saying for a couple of weeks now that wearing a fabric covering over our mouths and noses could help us stop the spread of coronavirus by containing coughs, sneezes and water droplets we all spread when we talk.We’re not talking about the more involved  personal protection equipment required to protect medical professionals and sick patients from catching the disease. There are no penalties yet. But eventually, police or local officials may start enforcing the practice with tickets and fines.And before you go there, don’t start whining about how this is stomping on your civil rights. This is an emergency health situation.And besides, we already have laws against indecent exposure and unsanitary practices that individuals and businesses collectively follow as members of society. (New slogan: “No shirt. No shoes. No mask. No service.”)It didn’t have to come to this. All we had to do was voluntarily take this basic safety precaution in order to protect others. So wear your mask. It’s mandatory now.More importantly, it’s the right thing to do.  We’re talking about a simple extra layer of protection to keep us from spewing our spit into the air and then having someone breathe it in or having it land on something that someone later touches.Taking this basic precaution — endorsed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — can be as simple as wearing a bandana over your face or cutting up an old t-shirt and hooking it around your ears with a couple of rubber bands. GAZETTE COVID-19 COVERAGEThe Daily Gazette is committed to keeping our community safe and informed and is offering our COVID-19 coverage to you free.Our subscribers help us bring this information to you. Please consider a subscription at DailyGazette.com/Subscribe to help support these efforts.Thank YouYet few of us have bothered to wear them— including vulnerable older people and workers at stores and other businesses.So the state government is stepping in.Gov. Andrew Cuomo, in a new executive order, has given us until 8 p.m. today (Friday)to start wearing masks or other face coverings whenever we’re near others in public. Specifically, it applies to all public spaces like grocery stores, public and private transportation (Uber/Lyft), and other public areas where you’re likely to encounter others.You don’t have to wear your mask every time you leave the house, but you should have it ready. For example, if you’re out walking and you’re not encountering others, feel free to pull the mask down. But when you’re about to come near others, you have to pull it up.center_img More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: No more extensions on vehicle inspectionsEDITORIAL: Don’t repeal bail reform law; Fix it the right wayEDITORIAL: Make a game plan for voting. Do it now.EDITORIAL: No chickens in city without strong regsFoss: Schenectady Clergy Against Hate brings people togetherlast_img read more

Senator LaValle Takes Heat For Stance

first_imgAdvocates of a proposal in New York State to reverse the statute of limitations laws that shield accused pedophiles from prosecution intend to make a renewed effort after the coming election.Members of the Republican-controlled New York State Senate have blocked assorted measures for years. The Catholic Church is a persistent lobbyist opposed to Look Back legislation as well.Greg Fischer, a Democrat, is running against the incumbent Ken LaValle in the First District. LaValle has either ignored or dodged questions about the matter for several months and has repeatedly blocked the proposed Child Victims Act that would reopen the window allowing pedophiles shielded by limitations to be prosecuted.“I dispute Mr. LaValle’s position that the injury is so widespread and pervasive that the CVA in any form will destroy our institutions via litigation,” Fischer said. He said studies have shown a wide range of disorders suffered by victims. “I believe the far greater harm is by the continuing injuries, including PTSD-type acute psychological and physiological injuries,” he said. “Further, failing to pass the CVA gives safe harbor to the degenerate pedophiles and that just nauseates me.”Gary Greenberg, founder of Fighting for Children and Protect NYKIDS, said LaValle has stymied numerous attempts at reform. “LaValle, along with the New York State Senate Republican Conference, has never allowed a vote on the Child Victims Act. The Assembly has passed the Child Victims Act six times with bipartisan support.”The Boy Scouts and insurance companies also are opposed to the CVA, and it is feared cases will tie up court dockets.“The CVA is not perfect, but sufficient at this time — additional legislation may be later enacted to perfect it,” Fischer said. “This year I worked with the Senate Republicans to come up with their own bill, which is called the Child Victims Fund. Mr. LaValle refused to even co-sponsor this Republican bill,” Greenberg said. “The Republican Conference refused for the 12th year in a row to bring any bill to the Senate floor for a vote.”Proponents are hopeful of gaining enough seats in the senate to get the necessary support for the Child Victims Act. Please see the accompanying article in this issue.rmurphy@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

BOC Gases signs multi year contract worth $20m

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Baltic Dry Index Hits New Record Low

first_imgThe Baltic Dry Index (BDI) dropped by another eight points reaching its new record low at 522 points on Monday.The Baltic Dry Index has fallen close to 50% over the past 12 months.The Baltic Capesize Index fell to 614 points, 16 points lower than last reported, whereas Baltic Supramax Index stood at 480 points, 6 points lower.Only Panamaxes seem to be holding out with the index at 505 points, recording a 6-point rise.The BDI’s downturn has seen dry bulk vessel owners left in dire conditions, especially since there are no signs of recovery any time soon.The recovery of the index seems to be further delayed as China enters its New Year festivities pulling a break on its bulk imports.As a result, the earnings have dwindled across the board, resulting in almost nonexistent interest in the newbuilding market, according to Allied Maritime Research.It is feared that the continued decline may have a ripple effect on bulk owners causing bankruptcies as shipping rates plunge even further.Danish shipping company Copenship A/S was forced to file for bankruptcy amid losses in the dry bulk sector triggered by low freight rates.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

And another thing …

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

Gunman ‘was seeking out,’ ambushed 6 Baton Rouge officers

first_img Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know. Gunman ‘was seeking out,’ ambushed 6 Baton Rouge officers Author: The Associated PressProducer:RACHEL ROTHE Published: July 18, 2016 8:32 AM EDT center_img BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) – A former Marine dressed in black and carrying extra ammunition ambushed police in Baton Rouge, shooting and killing three law enforcement officers less than two weeks after a black man was fatally shot by police there in a confrontation that sparked nightly protests that reverberated nationwide.Three other officers were wounded Sunday, one critically. Police said the gunman was killed at the scene.“His movements, his direction, his attention was on police officers,” state police Col. Mike Edmonson said Monday morning. He would not elaborate but said the gunman “certainly was seeking out police officers,” and he used the word “ambush” to describe the attack.Edmonson also confirmed that investigators have interviewed people with whom the shooter had contact with in Baton Rouge. But Edmonson wouldn’t say how many or give details. He stressed that the interviews don’t mean that those people were involved in the shooting and urged any others who might have had contact with or information about shooter Gavin Long to come forward.The shooting less than a mile from police headquarters added to the tensions across the country between the black community and police. Just days earlier, one of the slain officers had posted an emotional Facebook message about the challenges of police work in the current environment.President Barack Obama urged Americans to tamp down inflammatory words and actions.“We don’t need careless accusations thrown around to score political points or to advance an agenda. We need to temper our words and open our hearts … all of us,” Obama said.The gunman was identified as Gavin Long of Kansas City, who turned 29 Sunday.Long, who was black, served in the Marines from 2005 to 2010, reaching the rank of sergeant. He deployed to Iraq from June 2008 to January 2009, according to military records.Although he was believed to be the only person who fired at officers, authorities were investigating whether he had some kind of help.“We are not ready to say he acted alone,” state police spokesman Major Doug Cain said. Two “persons of interest” were detained for questioning in the nearby town of Addis. They were later released without any charges being filed.While in the military, Long was awarded several medals, including one for good conduct, and received an honorable discharge. His occupational expertise was listed as “data network specialist.”The University of Alabama issued a statement saying Long attended classes for one semester in the spring of 2012. A school spokesman said university police had no interactions with him.In Kansas City, police officers, some with guns drawn, converged on a house listed as Long’s.It was the fourth high-profile deadly encounter in the United States involving police over the past two weeks. In all, the violence has cost the lives of eight officers, including those in Baton Rouge, and two civilians and sparked a national debate over race and policing.Authorities initially believed that additional assailants might be at large, but hours later said there were no other active shooters. They did not discuss the gunman’s motive or any relationship to the wider police conflicts.The shooting began at a gas station on Airline Highway. According to radio traffic, Baton Rouge police answered a report of a man with an assault rifle and were met by gunfire. For several long minutes, they did not know where it was coming from.The radio exchanges were made public Sunday by the website Broadcastify.Nearly 2½ minutes after the first report of an officer getting shot, an officer on the scene is heard saying police do not know the shooter’s location.Almost 6 minutes pass after the first shots are reported before police say they have determined the shooter’s location. About 30 seconds later, someone says shots are still being fired.The recording lasts about 17 minutes and includes urgent calls for an armored personnel carrier called a BearCat.“There simply is no place for more violence,” Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said. “It doesn’t further the conversation. It doesn’t address any injustice perceived or real. It is just an injustice in and of itself.”From his window, Joshua Godwin said he saw the suspect, who was dressed in black with a ski mask, combat boots and extra bullets. He appeared to be running “from an altercation.”Mike Spring awoke at a nearby house to a sound that he thought was from firecrackers. The noise went on for 5 to 10 minutes, getting louder.Of the two officers who survived the shooting, one was hospitalized in critical condition, and the other was in fair condition. Another officer was being treated for non-life-threatening injuries, hospital officials said.Two of the slain officers were from the Baton Rouge Police Department: 32-year-old Montrell Jackson, who had been on the force for a decade, and 41-year-old Matthew Gerald, who had been there for less than a year.The third fatality was Brad Garafola, 45 and a 24-year veteran of the East Baton Rouge Sheriff’s Office.Jackson, who was black, posted his message on Facebook on July 8, just three days after the death of 37-year-old Alton Sterling, a black man killed by white Baton Rouge officers after a scuffle at a convenience store.In the message, Jackson said he was physically and emotionally tired and complained that while in uniform, he gets nasty looks. When he’s out of uniform, he said, some people consider him a threat.A friend of Jackson’s family, Erika Green, confirmed the posting, which is no longer on Facebook. A screenshot of the image was circulating widely on the internet.Police-community relations in Baton Rouge have been especially tense since Sterling’s death. The killing was captured on cellphone video.It was followed a day later by the shooting death of another black man in Minnesota, whose girlfriend livestreamed the aftermath of his death on Facebook. The next day, a black gunman in Dallas opened fire on police at a protest about the police shootings, killing five officers and heightening tensions even further.Thousands of people protested Sterling’s death, and Baton Rouge police arrested more than 200 demonstrators.Sterling’s nephew condemned the killing of the three Baton Rouge officers. Terrance Carter spoke Sunday to The Associated Press by telephone, saying the family just wants peace.“My uncle wouldn’t want this,” Carter said. “He wasn’t this type of man.”A few yards from a police roadblock on Airline Highway, Keimani Gardner was in the parking lot of a warehouse store that would ordinarily be bustling on a Sunday afternoon. He and his girlfriend both work there. But the store was closed because of the shooting.“It’s crazy. … I understand some people feel like enough is enough with, you know, the black community being shot,” said Gardner, an African-American. “But honestly, you can’t solve violence with violence.”Michelle Rogers and her husband drove near the shooting scene, but were blocked at an intersection closed by police.“I can’t explain what brought us here,” she said. “We just said a prayer in the car for the families.”Also Sunday, a domestic violence suspect opened fire on a Milwaukee police officer who was sitting in his squad car. The officer was seriously wounded, and the suspect fled and apparently killed himself, authorities said. SHARElast_img read more

Choking hazard prompts recall for Playtex plates, bowls

first_imgChoking hazard prompts recall for Playtex plates, bowls Three types of dog foods sold nationwide recalled over high levels of mold by-product SHARE FORT MYERS, Fla. A recall was issued for Playtex children’s plates and bowls product due to a hazard, the U.S. Consumer Product and Safety Commission said Tuesday.The product number 18-001 was recalled because of the clear plastic layer over the graphics, according to the commission. It can be removed from the plates and bowls, which could be harmful to small children.Anyone who has the product should return it for a refund.Go online or call Playtex at 1-888-220-2075 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday for responses to questions and concerns. Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know.center_img Published: October 4, 2017 10:03 AM EDT Updated: October 4, 2017 11:24 AM EDT Recommended Salmonella outbreak that sickened at least 41 people is linked to recalled mushrooms last_img read more